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  • About

Human Lines

HumanLines is a continuously evolving web documentary and portal of information created to disseminate academic research about the Humanitarian Corridors, a project of the Italian Bishops’ Conference.

The University of Notre Dame (US) is the owner of the HumanLines portal and is leading the research on the Humanitarian Corridors project.

 

Introduction - The Humanitarian Corridors Project

Between November 2017 and January 2019, the Humanitarian Corridors project, which is funded by the Italian Bishops’ Conference, made it possible for five hundred Eritrean, Somali, and South Sudanese refugees to leave Ethiopia and enter Italy via a legal and safe route.

The memorandum of understanding for the project, renewed for 2019, provided for the entry of another six hundred people from various countries, including Ethiopia, Niger, and Jordan.

The MOU’s signatories are the Italian Bishops’ Conference (acting through Caritas Italiana and the Migrantes Foundation), the Community of St. Egidio, the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, and the Italian Ministry of Interior.

 

If you want to know more, please read the full report on the Humanitarian Corridors project.

 

HL | The project

Because of the large numbers of refugees who are tempted to use the Mediterranean route, Humanitarian Corridors cannot be the only solution to the problems arising from human migration in the region, especially without more involvement of state institutions in the project. In fact, the current arrangement, in which all the financial costs are being borne by the Italian Bishops’ Conference, is not a sustainable path forward in the long term.

Nevertheless, HC is a concrete reality that embodies a certain perspective on the problems and proposes a path forward. With HumanLines, it is our intention to imagine and describe the encounters made possible by the project. Studying and recounting the stories that have arisen from HC show that it is a fundamentally important cultural reality for both individuals and communities, and HumanLines is our way of contributing to it.

Prof. Ilaria Schnyder von Wartensee and Prof. Clemens Sedmak, both of the University of Notre Dame, are responsible for this research project.

 

HL | The academic research project

Since 2018, Ilaria Schnyder von Wartensee and Clemens Sedmak at the University of Notre Dame (Indiana, US) have been working on a longitudinal research project aimed at monitoring and evaluating the various dynamics at work in the Humanitarian Corridors project, which embodies a new vision for thinking about immigration and reception.

 

If you want to know more, please read the full page.

 

HL | The objective

The goal of HumanLines is to narrate the stories and relate the dynamics, faces, beauty, and difficulties that make up and distinguish the Humanitarian Corridors project. The project is unique in that it provides an alternative vision to the current system of receiving vulnerable migrants with diverse characteristics. For this reason, the Humanitarian Corridors project involves an ambition and complexity that are difficult to grasp at first glance.

We have chosen to tell microstories that strive to provide insight into some fragments of this complexity, with the hope of creating a coherent, honest, and reliable mosaic of experiences.

We have chosen tools that allow us to relate these experiences through personal stories— contributions rooted in the everyday lives of the people involved in the project, including beneficiaries, workers, volunteers, and mediators.

The portal also hosts reports, academic articles, and other information that we believe will be useful for various kinds of users.

 

The following entities are the sponsors of the HumanLines research program:

The Henry Luce Foundation (US)

The Ford Family Program in Human Development Studies and Solidarity, Notre Dame (US)

The Kellogg Institute for International Studies, Notre Dame (US)